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26401 William Gray was 18 when he came to the Colony with Baillies Party in 1820 as an indentured servant to James Ford. He was a son of James Gray and born in Essex. In 1830 he married Elizabeth Marsden, daughter of George and Elizabeth Marsden. The Marsden’s came to the Colony with Dixon’s Party, at which time Elizabeth was 8 years old.
William seems to have moved around a great deal doing a number of unspecified jobs, but ultimately it seems that he was farming at Walsingham. He was also involved in all aspects of Settler life in his community.
In November 1850 he turned 49 and in March of 1851 was appointed Field Cornet for the area. Just 3 months later, on 2 June 1851, he was killed by rebel Hottentots in a field near Theophilis Mission while on active service in the 8th Frontier War. Details of the battle are recounted in The Reminiscences of Thomas Stubbs, which also describes William’s death and how tragic it was for his wife to hear the wagon arrive late that evening at her house and find her husband’s body being removed from it.
William left his wife and eight children: Eliza, Elleanor, George, Elizabeth, Susanna, Jane, William and James. He was buried in the cemetery, which would become the churchyard of the yet to be built St. James Anglican Church at Southwell.
Elizabeth, his wife died on 2 July 1886 in her 76th year. Eliza( 22 April 1832- 8 November 1915) is buried with her husband, John Ford (1823-1884) in the plot next to her sister Jane. The couple have 6 children buried with them.
George married on 14 January 1857 to Lydia Brown, daughter of Nathaniel Brown of Reed Fountain. William married Ellen Penny, daughter of Charles Penny junior. Jane died 2 November 1930 at the age of 87 – she never married.
In 1853 Rev. H. Waters wrote to George Southey, son in law of William, saying that a church was to be built at Southwell, partly in memory of William, and which would contain a memorial to William. The land was donated by Benjamin Keeton.
This abridged extract is one of 282 people listed in the book: Just ordinary People by Liz Eshmade 
Gray, William 1820 Settler (I24885)
 
26402 William Gray was 18 when he came to the Colony with Baillies Party in 1820 as an indentured servant to James Ford. He was a son of James Gray and born in Essex. In 1830 he married Elizabeth Marsden, daughter of George and Elizabeth Marsden. The Marsden’s came to the Colony with Dixon’s Party, at which time Elizabeth was 8 years old.
William seems to have moved around a great deal doing a number of unspecified jobs, but ultimately it seems that he was farming at Walsingham. He was also involved in all aspects of Settler life in his community.
In November 1850 he turned 49 and in March of 1851 was appointed Field Cornet for the area. Just 3 months later, on 2 June 1851, he was killed by rebel Hottentots in a field near Theophilis Mission while on active service in the 8th Frontier War. Details of the battle are recounted in The Reminiscences of Thomas Stubbs, which also describes William’s death and how tragic it was for his wife to hear the wagon arrive late that evening at her house and find her husband’s body being removed from it.
William left his wife and eight children: Eliza, Elleanor, George, Elizabeth, Susanna, Jane, William and James. He was buried in the cemetery, which would become the churchyard of the yet to be built St. James Anglican Church at Southwell.
Elizabeth, his wife died on 2 July 1886 in her 76th year. Eliza( 22 April 1832- 8 November 1915) is buried with her husband, John Ford (1823-1884) in the plot next to her sister Jane. The couple have 6 children buried with them.
George married on 14 January 1857 to Lydia Brown, daughter of Nathaniel Brown of Reed Fountain. William married Ellen Penny, daughter of Charles Penny junior. Jane died 2 November 1930 at the age of 87 – she never married.
In 1853 Rev. H. Waters wrote to George Southey, son in law of William, saying that a church was to be built at Southwell, partly in memory of William, and which would contain a memorial to William. The land was donated by Benjamin Keeton.
This abridged extract is one of 282 people listed in the book: Just ordinary People by Liz Eshmade 
Gray, William 1820 Settler (I24885)
 
26403 William Hayward, 22 years of age, a butcher by trade and brother of the above. William left the frontier and moved to Cape Town where he became a boot and shoemaker. In 1827 he married a widow Maria Ruperti (born Herbst), 20 years his senior. There were no children. In 1835 they drew up a will and William bequeathed his share to his mother; “Jane Broom, widow of the late Joseph Hayward.” Maria died in Cape Town in 1858. In 1853 William was declared insolvent. No record could be found of William after 1862. { David Raymer } Hayward, William 1820 Settler (I71526)
 
26404 William Henry owned the farms Kingston, Ellendale and Inkerman in the Victoria East District and Delville in the Fort Beaufort district. Cockcroft, William Henry (I6143)
 
26405 William Henry TAPSON was born on 2nd October 1856 in Horden near Goudhurst, Kent, England. He arrived in South Africa with his parents and siblings at the age of 7. After leaving school he earned his living both as a transport rider and a farmer. Henry was an extremely tall man (6 ft 41/2 ") and somewhere along the line lost an eye, allegedly poked out by an ox and thereafter had a glass eye. He died at the age of 84 in East London on the 4th January 1940. Tapson, William Henry (I96317)
 
26406 William Hobson married Ann Carey. She was the sister of Dr William Carey. It is he who it may be said started the stream of Bible translations. He had the urge to bring the Bible to men everywhere and this led him to carry the Gospel overseas. He was the first missionary to India being selected on 2 October 1792, after the Baptist Missionary Society was formed at Kettering. In India the early years were one of hardship and struggle. Eventually he was appointed professor of Sanskrit – the master key to many of India’s dialects. The professorship was at Fort William College, Calcutta.

Ann Hobson (nee Carey) gave herself to God – she thankfully insisted that she owed their discipleship to William Carey. Ann won her farmer husband to Christ who opened his Cottesbrook farmhouse for the preaching of the Gospel, to the anger of Sir James Langham of Langham Place who was his baronet landlord. He refused to allow the preaching as it was a departure from the church as Established. After William Hobson’s early death he evicted Ann, saying, “I certainly shall never feel disposed to surrender my farms and houses to those who oppose my wishes in matters which I consider of the utmost importance. Besides, your’s is a conspicuous family and of much influence in the neighbourhood”.

Ann then returned to her birthplace – Paulersbury – where they continued to farm. Like many other people in England at this time she must have fallen on hard times and decided to send her two youngest sons, David and William, to the Colony with the 1820 Settlers.

In all probability if they had not been persecuted for their religious beliefs they would not have been sent out with the Settlers.
 
Hobson, William (I44773)
 
26407 William Hunter became a Wesleyan local preacher at Birkenhead and offered himself for the ministry in 1860. He was posted to South Africa and spent 20 years as a missionary in the Eastern Cape.
He married Louisa Maria Barnes on 31/1/1866. They had 5 sons and 2 daughters.
Hunter was a gifted linguist and teacher and wrote hymns, tracts and textbooks in Xhosa. He was a member of the Board for the Revision of the Xhosa Bible. He revised Rev. W J Davis' Xhosa Dictionary.
In 1878 he developed a 'troat affection' and was given a year's leave to recuperate in England. He returned to England finally in 1880 for health reasons. He retired in 1899 and died at Sevenoaks, Kent in 1905. {Lynn Macleod} 
Hunter, William (I4262)
 
26408 William Hutton was educated at the Western Province Preparory School and at St. Andrew's College, Grahamstown,. He farmed at Shenfield, the family farm, and saw service in the 1939-1945 war.

The following summary of his life is from the Registry of St. Andrew's College,
Grahamstown.

3108 Lucas, William Hutton de Neuville , son of A .; Left Dec. 1924; b.19.5.07; Upper. Form III-IV. VIII*; Farmer, Shenfield; S.A.A. Signals. Sgt. '41; Lieut. '42. Shenfield, P.O. Koekemoer, Tvl. 
Lucas, William Hutton de Neufville (I83666)
 
26409 William Impey 'Stanford' Driver was in the Cape Civil Service until 1895 and then joined the Rhodesian Civil Service until 1901
He then became Native Commissioner in the Transvaal until 1927.
He then farmed in the 'Waterberg' area taking a prominent part in public affairs.
He served in the Matabele Rebellion as a Lieuteneant and then in the Transvaal Rebellion as a Captain.
He served in East Africa during the First World War and retired as an Hon. Major (Mil. Political.
He died in Warmbaths on the 1st September 1948.
issue: 4 sons 2 daughters 
Driver, Hon. Major William Impey Stanford (I612)
 
26410 William is believed to have gone out to SA from Scotland with the military.
Death Notice #4672 Filed ? Oct 1840
William Graham, born in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland of Stewart and Jane Graham, aged forty years by trade a blacksmith, married. Died on the seventh of October in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Forty, at his house situated in the New Town of Fort Beaufort in the District of Albany, South Africa, leaving Jane, William and Robert his three minor children.

Property as follows: One Erf of ground situated in George Styreet, No. 260? Grahams Town, without improvements,
One Erf situated in D’Urbans Street No….in the New Town of Fort Beaufort, whereon? Is one house containing two rooms? And Blacksmiths shop, one small house on ? ?, ? garden and other trifling improvements, one small building Lot of ground situated in Grahams Town on Erf No….. in ….. street
Blacksmith? Tools consisting of one anvil, two vices, one bellows and sundry other tools belonging to the trade, About Seven Hundred weight of Iron, one New Wagon not ? and wood for three? Wagons not made
? Furniture consisting of one yellow wood bedsted, two mattresses and other bed linen, two? Chairs, two small tables, two ? and sundry other articles
????
Signed by: Elizabeth G Graham
Witnesses: George V Eastland and Thos. H Eastland (her brothers)
 
Graham, William (I110538)
 
26411 William is listed by Nash, but not on his fathers death notice. Nash, etc., give his impled date of birth as 1804 which is impossible if Joseph was born in 1794! Was he really a child of Joseph, or just assumed to save the deposit costs? Latham, William 1820 Settler (I136735)
 
26412 William is not mentioned in his father's Death Notice in 1847.

Darryl Allwright writes:
"I found a document of a "William Jarvis alias William Allwright" stating the following: In 1898 his occupation is stated that of a Butcher residing at Outshoorn. On the 7 May 1898 William (aged 63) firstly produced a forged letter to the Super Intendant of the Sailor Home, a certain Henry Goode, in Cape Town stating the following: "Please give the bearer Wm Wright food for 3 days and charge the same to me".
Signed Rev. William Flint of Rose Bank, Wynberg.
Secondly on 9 May 1898 he produced another letter to "Messrs Scott Bros", an Importing Company in Cape Town, owned by Alfred Hilliard, to a certain Alfred Gurney, an assistant, stating that the bearer William Wright has just started work? (at age 63) and must be supplied with an overcoat and be charged to Rev. William Flint. Alfred Gurney did however supply the overcoat belonging to Mr. Alfred Hilliard.
Thirdly he also produced another letter to a certain George Black, an importer for an overcoat, a pair of boots, cap and braces also signed by Rev William Flint. Mr Black also supplied William with the goods.
On 15 July 1898 he was given a notice that states that the evidence of his conviction of theft on 24 June 1891 (aged 56) has been withdrawn. So it appears this was his second run-in with the law. The Honorable Mr. Justice Maasdorp found William guilty of theft and was sentenced to nine months hard labour in prison on 15 July 1898. We now know that this is not our William, but who is this gentlemen William Jarvis going by the alias of "William Allwright". (DWA) 
Allwright, William (I110155)
 
26413 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Jervois, William (I23804)
 
26414 William John Lane was a paramedic in the British Army. He came to South Africa serving the in the British army, during the Boer War Lane, William John (I58266)
 
26415 William joined the Cape Mounted Regt of Riflemen in 1836 and served with them until 1850. He was discharged for medical reasons on 23.7.1850 – catarrh, shortness of breath and loss of voice. He was 42 years old, was a shoemaker by trade, had dark eyes and hair and was 5ft 7ins in height. {Dorothea Rowse} Newth, William 1820 Settler (I132451)
 
26416 William joined the Royal Navy in 1920 and served until 1956, retiring as a Captain. He was involved with the sinking of the Bismarck.
 
Rutherford, Captain William Francis Henry Crawford CBE, DSO (I152428)
 
26417 William Kent barnes was a painter in Grahamstown, and later moved to work on the Main Reef Mine in the Transvaal. He was a keen Methodist churchman and a lay preacher. Barnes, William Kent (I4278)
 
26418 William lived on Bromsgrove,Peddie; Crossroads, Peddie and Inglewood, Maclear Reynolds, William Lewis (I13934)
 
26419 William lived on the farm Rankleburn in the Barkly East district and his two children appear to have been born while he and his wife were living there. It seems that he moved to the Transvaal some time after the birth of his second child, how long he lived there is unknown but at some stage after his wife's death he moved back with his two small children to the farm Glengyle in the Barkly East district where his brother in law farmed. He would seem to have been very popular with children and was a great story teller, he was affectionatly known as Oompie. When the children were older he moved to Maclear where he purchased the farm Merlin on the Mooi river, where he lived till his death. He is buried here in an unmarked grave with a privet hedge, long
grown out of hand, round the grave. Ralph and I went to find it.

In Archive File there is an order of Guardianship signed by Margaret Hannah Gush to William Davies Gush for Margaret Grainger and Alice Gush. Why ?? 
Gush, William Davies (I40043)
 
26420 William married Mary Marsh after the death of his first wife. It would seem that in 1826 William was assaulted by one William Banks who had emigrated with James' Party. William Banks was sentenced to three years on Robben Island followed by seven years' banishment from Albany.

Grahamstown Journal dated Saturday 29 June 1850
DIED, at Graham's Town, on Saturday, the 22d instant, Mr. William ATTWELL, Commissariat store-keeper, aged 53 years. Deceased, who was a British Settler of 1820, had served in the Commissariat on this Frontier for 28 years, longer, it is believed, than any other officer here in that department. During that extended period he maintained a character of unblemished integrity, and was justly respected for the unobtrusive, but faithful discharge of the duties of his office. He has left an aged father, a widow, and a family of children to deplore their irreparable loss. 
Atwell, William 1820 Settler (I21609)
 
26421 William married twice.
From indexes of the Cape Archives and the Familia article it appears he had a few children
d1 Theunissina Johanna (31.8.1865)
d2 Jemima Antoinetta (28.3.1867)
d3 Anna Carolina (11.2.1869)
d4 William Ralph (17.6.1871)
d5 Maria Elizabeth (25.6.1872)
d6 Steven Petrus (11.11.1873)
d7 Edward Henry Pawle (27.8.1877-10.6.1882). The four-year-old E. H. P. Guest died at the home of his grandfather W. C. Guest at George; his estate was subsequently valued at ninety-one pounds.

Going by the date of the motion to release their inheritance it would appear they are children of his first marriage to Annie Caroline Van Wyk
From his death record there appears to be another child
- Fred
and in the death records there is a reference to a Lilian Scholtz Robertson born Guest
I would presume the latter two are from the second marriage to Christina Elisabeth Scholtz
According to Familia he and his younger brother James Henry farmed at "Leeuwenblad" in the district of Oudtshoorn.
Also from another family tree site it would seem that he and Christina had more children


DEPOT KAB
SOURCE CSC
TYPE LEER
VOLUME_NO 2/6/1/118
SYSTEM 01
REFERENCE 202
PART 1
DESCRIPTION MOTION. PETITION OF WILLIAM JAMES GUEST IN RE PAYMENT OUT OF THE
INHERITANCE OF WILLIAM RALPH AND ANNA CAROLINA GUEST TO FURTHER
THEIR EDUCATION.
STARTING 18880000
ENDING 18880000

DEPOT KAB
SOURCE CSC
TYPE LEER
VOLUME_NO 2/6/1/125
SYSTEM 01
REFERENCE 131
PART 1
DESCRIPTION MOTION. PETITION OF WILLIAM JAMES GUEST, FATHER AND NATURAL GUARDIAN
OF STEPHEN PIETER GUEST IN RE PAYMENT FROM HIS INHERITANCE FOR HIS
EDUCATION.
STARTING 18900000
ENDING 18900000
DEPOT KAB
SOURCE MOOC
TYPE LEER
VOLUME_NO 7/1/388
SYSTEM 01
REFERENCE 16
PART 1
DESCRIPTION GUEST, WILLIAM JAMES. INVENTORY.
STARTING 18780000
ENDING 18780000
REMARKS FILED 1878.
 
Guest, William James (I88539)
 
26422 William matriculated in 1885 from Diocesan College, Rondebosch (Bisops).
He bred dogs (Golden Setters) and was interested in horse racing. An
athlete and hurdler, captained a squadron in the Boer war, and became
very prosperous on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange before becoming
bankrupt c 1912. 
Kidger, William Cawood (I13668)
 
26423 William matriculated in 1885 from Diocesan College, Rondebosch (Bisops). He bred dogs (Golden Setters) and was interested in horse racing. An athlete and hurdler, captained a squadron in the Boer war, and became very prosperous on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange before becoming bankrupt c 1912. Kidger, William Cawood (I13668)
 
26424 William McLUCKIE came as a Settler in Benjamin MOODIE's party of Scottish settlers from Leith in 1817, His parents were Andrew McLUCKIE and Jean née MEFFIN. William was born on 14 June 1790 at Kippen, Stirling, Scotland. He died on 25 Mar 1881 at Woodlands, Southwell, which he purchased on 2 March 1832( Lower Albany Chronicle, part 2.) McLuckie, William (I10907)
 
26425 William Miller was one of the leading figures in the foundation of the Baptist denomination in Southern Africa. Originally from England, he and his wife, Elizabeth Miller, were a part of a small Baptist congregation, consisting of only eleven people, who joined the "1820 Settlers," a group of pioneers who landed on South African soil in 1820 at Algoa Bay, situated in the current Eastern Cape Province. Shortly after their arrival the Baptists held their first service under a thorn tree in front of Miller's tent. Hereafter Miller began to assume the role of the spiritual shepherd for the small congregation.

The church was formally founded under the leadership of William Shepherd who built a cottage to accommodate their religious services in Salem and encouraged the congregation to recognize William Miller as the official pastor of the church. As soon as this was finalized, the Lord's Supper (communion) was celebrated for the first time in South Africa in a Baptist church. The small church at Salem began to grow slowly and opportunities opened for Miller to minister in the town of Grahamstown, some thirty miles away. For quite some time he moved back and forth between the two towns, at first by foot and later by horse, until he found it necessary to seek employment in a carpenter's shop in Grahamstown. This move allowed him to focus more specifically on the congregation in Grahamstown, which first outgrew the cottage they were borrowing initially for their services, and then even outgrew the carpenter's shop where Miller worked. Apparently the congregation became quite the talk of the town whenever they would march down to the river that ran through the town to baptize new converts. As the congregation was growing, they decided that it was time to build a proper church building. Miller laid the foundation stone and the congregation gave as much as they could, both in materials and financially and helped with the construction of the chapel as well. The first Baptist chapel was officially opened in July 1824. The congregation flourished under the leadership and care of their shepherd, William Miller.

Miller remained the pastor of the congregation for thirty years in total before stepping down, but even after this he remained intimately involved in the church until his death. He died on the November 29, 1856 at the age of seventy-seven. After the death of his first wife, Elizabeth Dennison, in about 1821 in Salem, Eastern Cape, Miller appears to have remained a widower until January 6, 1843 when he married Ann Humphreys nee Watson in the Baptist Church, Grahamstown. From her age at this time it would appear that she was born in 1792 and died on January 28, 1857 in Grahamstown. Her first husband was a Richard Joseph Humphreys whom she would have married around 1810 in England prior to coming to South Africa with the 1820 Settlers. It is not known when he died although there is a request from him to the Colonial Government for a grant of land in 1837. He and Ann had nine children, the last being born in 1831. Miller had four children from his first marriage and they were all born in England prior to them sailing for South Africa with the 1820 Settlers.

Miller founded the Baptist denomination with a mere handful of people, but from these humble beginnings the denomination has grown and has become one of the most wide-spread and active denominations in southern Africa, with hundreds of congregations and several theological training institutions.

Bradley Anderson

Bibliography:

Holt, Basil. Our 1820 Founder: A Memoir. South Africa: South African Baptist Historical Society.
Ayliff, John. "Memoir of Mr. Wm. Miller, Founder of the Baptist Interest in South Africa" in The South African Christian Watchman and Wesleyan Church and School Record (vol. IV, no. 2, Feb. 1857) pp. 37-45.
Roy, Kevin. Zion City RSA: The Story of the Church in South Africa. South African Baptist Historical Society: Cape Town. 2000.
Hudson-Reed, Sydney (ed.). Together for a Century: History of the Baptist Union of South Africa. South African Baptist Historical Society: Pietermaritzburg. 1977.
Hockly, Harold Edward. The Story of the British Settlers of 1820 in South Africa. 2nd enlarged and revised edition. Cape Town and Johannesburg: Juta & Co. 1957.

This article, received in 2004, was written by Bradley Anderson, a student at Capetown Baptist Seminary, a DACB participating institution, under the supervision of Dr. Kevin Roy, liaison coordinator.
http://dacb.org/stories/southafrica/miller_william.html

Interesting newspaper article 
Miller, Reverend William 1820 Settler (I58228)
 
26426 William must have grown up in the Salem area and probably went to school at Mrs Matthews academy in Salem. Very little however is known about William's early years it may be presumed that he farmed somewhere in that area as his children were born there.
During the late 1860's William trekked North eventually settling on the farm Hentlands in the Barkly East district. According to his daughter Sophie who was about 8 years old at the time, when they arrived on the farm Hentlands the thermeda grass was in seed and looked almost like a land of wheat in ear. He did not however stay there long as he felt that his neighbours the Bothas were not very honest. He then trekked further eventually reaching the Transvaal, this move was however disasterous as he lost most of his livestock to disease. From here he moved into Natal where his few remaining livestock died and he decided to move back and eventually settled in Maclear, possably on the farm Woodcliffes. Most if not all of his children returned from Natal with him although some moved away when they grew up.
In latter years he was fond of pottering in his vegetable garden. One day he was busy in the garden and as so often happened in Maclear a mist drizzle came down and William became drenched, when he eventually came indoors instead of changing immediately he decided to rest awhile as a result of this he developed pneumonia and died. 
Gush, William (I40066)
 
26427 William must have lived most of his adult life in what is now the Free State, probably in the Dewetsdorp area. What ever he did he must have been extremly succesful as at his death his estate was worth 40,000 pounds an absolute fortune this in spite of the fact that he was only 36 yrs old. Sephton, William Edward 1820 Settler (I61644)
 
26428 William never married. Duffield, William George (I12016)
 
26429 William never married. Goldswain, William Rupert Jeremiah (I13135)
 
26430 William owned the farms, Kingston, Ellendale & Inkerman in the Victoria East District,E.Cape & Delville in
the Fort Beaufort District. 
Cockcroft, William Henry (I6143)
 
26431 William returned to England in the hope of tracing some of their possessions which had not been put on the Kennersley Castle. {Some Frontier Families, p 142} He was apparently not allowed to return to South Africa. He played cricket for All England. Occupation : Glassmaker in Stourbridge, Worcestershire, England. { Groves Gedcom file }

He was a glass maker and one of the founders of the glassmaking firm of Davis, Greathead and Green in Brettell Lane in Dudley. They exhibited at the Great Exhibition in 1851, moving a year or two later to the Dial Glassworks.
see References from Worldwide Greathead family One-Name study (http://www.greathead.org/) 
Greathead, William 1820 Settler (I2693)
 
26432 William REYNOLDS was born at sea about 1791 to 1793. He joined the 13th Hussars as a trumpeter in 1806 while still a boy and, according to his certificate of discharge from the army, fought in Portugal, Spain, at Waterloo (for which he was granted an extra two years service towards his pension), was sent to India in 1819 and transferred to the Cape regiment of Cavalry in 19 June 1823. The regiment was disbanded and he was discharged to pension in 1827.

Sarah had been married to another NCO in the Cape Regiment who died in 1826. William died 12 Dec 1855 at Fort England, Grahamstown.
Sarah was born about 1803 in Guernsey (Channel Islands) and died 23 May 1871. Both are buried in the Old Cemetery, Grahamstown. 
Reynolds, William (Pvt) (I45360)
 
26433 William Robert moved from Queenstown to Kimberley in 1874 during the diamond rush. He made his fortune on a diamond claim and bought a large farm at Koffiefontein. In 1885 he stood surety for a friend in a business deal and lost all he had. William Robert Stilwell died 31 March 1895 in Johannesburg hospital. His widow (Susannah Smith Hartley) left South Africa for England and died in January 1905 Stillwell, William Robert (I11391)
 
26434 William Robert White was in the first pioneer column to enter what is now Zambia in the 1890's. The column crossed the Zambesi, above the Victoria Falls. White, William Robert (I113569)
 
26435 William Rogers /Elliott/
Name ELLIOT on tombstone 
Elliott, William Rogers (I42206)
 
26436 William Russell BOWKER was born in the Eastern Cape in 1855, the eleventh of twelve children, the fourth of five sons, born to The Hon. Bertram Egerton BOWKER. Bertram BOWKER arrived with his parents, as a child of ten, with the 1820 Settlers to South Africa, who settled in the Grahamstown area of the Eastern Cape. In due time Russell BOWKER married Helena BIRT and they had one daughter, Margeret.

Russell, after serving with some distinction in the Boer War, visited Kenya in 1901 and was so impressed with the farming/ranching possibilities he vowed that as soon as he had sorted out his affairs and estates in South Africa, he would return to take up land being offered to settlers by the Kenya Government of the day.
In 1904, Russell returned to Kenya bringing with him, some thirty odd aspirant farmers, with their families, from various parts of South Africa.
The Kenya Government was so impressed with BOWKER's efforts to bring in new settler family units, as they were desperately needed to develop the farming and ranching potential of the new Colony, that they offered him six 5000 acre concessional farm properties, as opposed to the normal 5000 acres at the time. BOWKER took up 30,000 acres in the Kedong valley below the Kijabe escarpment, naming his new ranch Mount Margeret Estate, after his daughter.
BOWKER died in 1920? (1916) and was buried on the top of Mount Margeret, on his estate. His daughter Margeret had some years previously married Frank William DOUGLASS who was a large estate owner in the Trans Nzoia, where he ranched cattle and also introduced the cultivation of flax.
Frank and Margeret had a son, Russell Bowker DOUGLASS, who became a noted white hunter in Tanganyika. They also had one daughter, Margeret Frances DOUGLASS, who married Cecil William ALLEN in 1925 and had one son, John ALLEN.
It is of interest that Russell BOWKER, Frank DOUGLASS, Cecil ALLEN and Jock CLEVERLY - John ALLEN's great-grandfather, grandfather, father and father-in-law respectively all served with the East African Mounted Rifles in 1915. Probably a unique family combination in Regimental service.

 
Bowker, William Russell (I195)
 
26437 William SARGEANT, widower, m. 19 Apr 1860, Wesleyan Chapel, Grahamstown, Cape Colony; Mary SHACKLETON, born SIMPSON, Widow; Rev. William IMPEY; Entry #431; Witnesses: W SIMPSON, (Mrs.) Jane Compton PLATT Family (F36938)
 
26438 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Surmon, William James Godfrey (I138210)
 
26439 William Simpson SLATER, son of William SLATER, Lieutenant of the Garrison Company and Mary CONNER; born 24 Mar 1815, baptised 11 Nov 1815, at Uitenhage; Witnesses: Charles ALLEN, Martin and Mary FLEISCHER; note that the baptisms (see all 11 Nov 1815) were conducted at Uitenhage, and entered in the NGK George Register. Slater, William Simpson (I126147)
 
26440 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Smith, William (I53839)
 
26441 William TERWIN - Miller of Woburn, Alice Dist.
"*Mr George Terwin: his son (newspaper cutting Abt. 1933
There was widespread sorrow throughout the town and district when it became known on Saturday afternoon that Mr George Terwin, the old miller of Woburn, had been called to his rest.
With his passing one more well known and respected personality is removed from the historic Tyumie Valley, and many as they go backwards and forwards through Woburn will miss George Terwin, who has resided there for so many long years. Mr Terwin was born in Grahamstown nearly 75 years ago, and came as a little boy with his parents to Woburn; where his farther took over the mill. He came from fine old English stock, his father having been born at Kings Kurzwell, Devon, and subsequently migrating as a settler to South Africa. In those early days Woburn was a place of considerable activity as much wheat and grain was grown in the valley; and the rust which is now so serious a problem to the wheat farmers was unknown.
Also the modern steam roller mill were unknown, there were no railways, and most of the grain grown in a wide area was carted to Woburn to be ground. The Terwin family were well placed financially and did a big
business, erecting a new water-wheel mill. This work of building and fixing up the new mill was undertaken by a highly skilled mill-wright, Mr James Brown from Tinwald, Dumfriesshire in Scotland; and in time the late George Terwin married his daughter Margaret, who survives him, and is one of the most beloved residents in the Valley. There were four sons and a daughter, Mrs Harold Smith, whose husband now owns the old Terwin property. Of the sons only Preston could be at the funeral, as Robert is in Lichtenberg, Douglas at Umzimkulu, and Frank in Zululand. We offer them all our deep sympathy in this hour of bereavement.
The late Mr.Terwin,who must have seen many changes in his life, liked nothing more than talk about the old days, and many were the incidents which he recounted of the wilder and unsettled life of his youth when the
farmers in these parts lived in constant danger of war, and the terrible massacre of 1850 was an ever present reality, and not as it is now, a mere memory of the past. In those days it was all horses, long rides and drives from one town to another, and always armed, while Mr. Terwin was acknowledged as one of the finest horsemen in the district. In his passing a link with the past has snapped, and the pity is that many of his experiences of earlier days have not found their way into print.

On Sunday afternoon St Bartholomew's Church was crowded with farmers from all quarters, many of them being unable to find seats. The service was taken by the Rector, the Rev. H.L. Henchman, who delivered an
appropriate address.After two hymns were sung, the procession moved to the grave where the Rev.H.B. Henchman read "Man that is born of a woman" and said a few words, the service closing with the hymn "Abide with me."
The chief mourners were, the widow, Ethel, and Preston, Mr. Percy Terwin, (brother) and Mrs. Terwin's two married sisters and their husbands, Mr. and Mrs, Gibson and Mr. and Mrs....'.unreadable ' The pall-bearers were Messrs A J Smith, W Francis, D J McLeod, P Loest, W Brown and G W Knott, while floral tributes were sent by the following: - Loving wife and the boys; Harold Ethel and children; Brown family; Miss M Stewart;
Mr & Mrs Garfield Ralph; D J McLeod and family; Rev and Mrs Henchman; Mrs Thomas and family; Mr and Mrs Little;Mr and Mrs Cusens and family; Ivy and Wallie; George Bauer; Mrs McIntosh and Miss Pollock; Mr and Mrs W Dewey; Audrey and Ernest Francis (Johannesburg); Mr and Mrs D Ballantyne; Mrs J Knott; Mjilo; Mrs N Lock, Lorna and Miss Gray; Pickie Lock; Mrs J Pollock and family; Pat Amy and family; Miss Tong ( Grahamstown); Miss Petersen (Johannesburg);Peggy Kinsley and Athalie Lock; Nurse Prince; Mr and Mrs A W Terwin and family; Archie Terwin; Mrs Frank Lock, Rona and Athalie; Mr Edwin Lock (Grahamstown); Mr and Mrs McGillivray and family; Mr and Mrs E D M (unreadable); Eric and Molly Dewey; Mr H Dewey and family; Will, Mary and family; Athel Ivy and family;Mr and Mrs Ferguson; Mr and Mrs W Schmidt, Will Jane and family; Bernard and Lucy; Uncle Tom and family; Mr and Mrs Percy Lock and family and Emma; Athel and family; Lilian; Mr and Mrs Humphreys and Ethel; Mr Robinson; Mrs Harber and family; Paul Lily and family; all at
Battlesden; H H Loest and family; Mr and Mrs Senick; Mr Darlow: Mr and Mrs Munro and Miss Munro; Nellie Tonnie and Mr Hazell; Mr and Mrs Scutt; Mr and Mrs A J Smith, Joyce and George;Major and Mrs Geddes; all at Hopefield; Mr and Mrs and Miss Robertson; Mrs Painter and family; TJ Summerton; Sister Humphreys and a lot of others without names. H.H.L. " (ex Roger Dowell;) 
Terwin, George (I162850)
 
26442 William was a bootmaker and farmer. Elizabeth was known as Eliza. Farley, William 1820 Settler (I12734)
 
26443 William was a Farmer. He sold his farm in the Peddie District in 1903 and trekked to Senekal , Orange Free State. There he bought a farm and sold it in 1913. He moved to Vryburg, Cape , where he bought the farm "Lucknow". At his death the farm was subdivided and named "East End"; "Shamrock "; "Bristol" and "Lucknow". Stirk, William Southey (I5921)
 
26444 William was a Farmer. He sold his farm in the Peddie District in 1903 and trekked to Senekal, Orange Free State. There he bought a farm and sold it in 1913. He moved to Vryburg, Cape, where he bought the farm "Lucknow". At his death the farm was subdivided and named "East End"; "Shamrock"; "Bristol" and "Lucknow". Stirk, William Southey (I5921)
 
26445 William was a wagonmaker and they lived in Port Elizabeth. Hinton, William Henry (I13429)
 
26446 William was a widower and a Tailer. Susannah was a Spinster and worked as a Pawnbroker. The Vicar was Henry Luxmoore. The mark of X of both William and Susannah were witnessed by George Parkin and J N O Thorne. Family (F46710)
 
26447 William was a widower when he came to SA, then a missionary in China, In
Business in Christiana during Diamond Days and then a School Teacher. 
Edwards-White, William (I111009)
 
26448 William was a woolcomber in Wellington Southey, William (I16817)
 
26449 William was an Officer in the Indian Army. A member of the family informs that he was a best
man at swords and that the family have a sword in its scabbard belonging to him and inscribed
by Queen Victoria. 
Lott, William (I110577)
 
26450 William was granted the Freedom of the City of London, July 1786 Southey, William (I10351)
 

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